Le Film de mon père

Le Film de mon père

Filmmaker Jules Guarneri grew up in Villars among his adopted siblings in a chalet that is regularly haunted by the ghost of his mother. His father, head and guardian of the family chalets, films himself daily and hands over his cinematic legacy to Jules with the instruction that he should make his first film from it. Thus begins a tricky, intimate and at times pleasurable journey into Jules’ independence.

LE FILM DE MON PÈRE ultimately becomes a very different film from the one his father imagined. Jules Guarneri takes an empathetic and reflexive look at this somewhat neurotic family material and humorously performs a symbolic patricide on the cutting board. The resulting family portrait celebrated its world premiere at the Vision du Réel, where it was awarded the Jury Prize.

Je Suis Noires

Je Suis Noires

In Switzerland, a country of neutrality, new, unfamiliar voices are being heard. Voices of women who fight for the recognition of structural racism, deconstruct stereotypes and confess their double identity as Swiss and Black. It is in this context that Rachel M’Bon begins her own search for identity. On her way to liberation, she questions her past, her present and holds up a mirror to her country and her peers.

The strength and determination with which Rachel M’Bon confronts her past is the strength of this film, which represents an important step towards opening up a discourse that has been suppressed for too long. Together with filmmaker Juliana Fanjul, the Swiss-Congolese journalist interrogates her country and portrays six protagonists. Each of them tells a story that reflects her own personal path to liberation.

We show the film in combination with the short film ETHEREALITY by Kantarama Gahigiri.
Stranded in space for 30 years. How does it feel to finally come home? A reflection on migration and the sense of belonging.

Kantarama Gahigiri is a Rwandan-Swiss filmmaker. In 2004 she won the prestigious Fullbright Award and moved to New York where she completed her Masters in Film. Her first feature film TAPIS ROUGE was screened and awarded worldwide.

Mediterranean Fever

Mediterranean Fever

Waleed (40) lives in Haifa with his wife and children and dreams of a writing career while suffering from chronic depression. He develops a close relationship with his neighbor (a small-time crook) with an ulterior plot in mind. While the scheme turns into an unexpected friendship between the two men, it leads them into a journey of dark encounters.

In this humorous thriller-drama, Maha Haj draws a delicate portrait of the Palestinian existence. She takes the fictional character Waleed to extremes and thus reflects on the state of an entire society.

Press review
A delicate balance between comedy and darker drama throughout.
The Hollywood Reporter

A mixture of comedy, thriller and character study.
In Haifa, an unlikely friendship between two neighbours is the basis of a new exploration of masculinity and mental illness.
Screendaily

A black comedy full of surprises.
Cineuropa

A E I O U – A Quick Alphabet of Love

A E I O U – A Quick Alphabet of Love

She thought it would never happen to her again.
He didn’t even know such a thing existed.
A woman, a boy and another impossible love story.

Anna (Sophie Rois) is 60, lives alone in West Berlin and has left her career as a celebrated acting star long behind her. Adrian (Milan Herms) is 17 years old and has stolen Anna’s handbag on the open street. Normally, two such different people would probably not meet a second time, but fate has other plans. Anna, who apart from her neighbour Michel (Udo Kier) has virtually no social contacts, is persuaded to become a voice coach and give lessons to a young man with a speech impediment. And as chances would have it, her new student is none other than Adrian.

In AEIOU, Nicolette Krebitz designs a relationship that not only surprises with a lot of tenderness and a wild, poetic hand stroke, but also turns both characters into individuals of integrity, self-empowered with each other, learning. Neither feels guilt, neither feels shame, both feel love and yet remain completely with themselves, lonely together, but not in the discouragement usually inherent in that phrase. On the contrary, it is a wild, unpredictable courage that stands above everything and leads the character development. Axel Timo Purr, Artechock